colourful

Blast Off

Evil Eleanor as Brendara, ready to blast some blood-sucking bats to bits

Great we've managed to book up a number of public presentations of Galdo's Gift.  That's fantastic!  Woo hoo!  Go Tapocketa, yeah!

---pause---

'Yay.  Good.''

---pause---

'Yeah, it's going to be good.'

....

'Er, have you had any thoughts as to what we might do?'

'I dunno, you?'

Well, thankfully, ideas and elaboration are our strong point; our problem is time.  We need to find some way of presenting our book to a whole bunch of heckling children that is fun colourful and inventive and relatively quick.  We decided the best idea was to blow everything up.

That is to say, we would take the illustrations directly from the book and blow them up to human size so we could perform the story at full scale.  We would just need to work out how we could attach the character heads to ourselves and be able to switch them quickly.

 

Ingredients:

A whole bunch of illustrations

A bemused local printing shop

A lot of thick card

Tonnes of Velcro

A huge loss of dignity

 

With a skull cap made from Velcro (which looked fine on Eleanor but for some reason on me gave the air of someone all prepped up for the electric chair, 'sorry, kids') and its Velcro counterpart attached to the back of each character mask; we had our quick-change system ready.

some of the card masks and props ready for the school presentation

Child's Play

Our first 'gig' would be Commonswood Primary School in Welwyn Garden City.  We had initially asked if we could 'perhaps, kindly have a quick session talking to a few children about the book, if that would be to much of a problem, thank you'. 

Cut to: booked for seven half hour sessions each with thirty children (the last session would actually be sixty children) aged from seven to eleven, all on the same day.  -'Oh, *gulp*, thank you, that sounds great'.  Oh God.

Ok, so no hiding, time to step up...

5... 4... 3... 2... 1...

(to be continued...)

 

 
Ready for battle

Ready for battle

 

Chin tucks and nose jobs

What chin? Who nose?

What chin? Who nose?

So the heroine of our story, Brendara, is not looking herself.

BEFORE

BEFORE

Not sure why, she just seems distant, aloof, not her old self.  Is it the hair?  I don't think so.  Maybe the clothes, a new hat, perhaps?  No, she's always had that hat, she's always had those clothes.

Maybe the chin?  Hmmm, Brendara thinks so, so we are going to try some other chins.  Let's see...

Cue make over music

Cue make over music

So tricky, some make her look too sinister, some make her look too stupid (sorry, Brendara).

However....

Ladies and gentleman, after all the votes have been counted and verified, we have a winner.

Brendara final illustration on white

No that's more like it.

To the Bat Cave, Let's Go!

The stage is set for our herione...

'Away inside a distant cliff face, our brave heroine bravely battles away again a colony of fearsome foes...'

What?  What do you mean she's not there?  Your kidding, right?  Don't tell me the fearsome foes are late as well.  What kind of show is this?  They were supposed to be here days ago.  Don't tell me they're stuck in traffic; I won't believe you.  There is no traffic around here.

I suppose all we can do is admire the view until they arrive.

As you can see the cave here is made up of many layers to create a picture book/pop up book feel or perhaps like a stage play set.  Like a stage play, the set is all important in setting the scene.  We need to consider where our actors will be placed, how they will be lit and how their surroundings will compliment this.

Cramming our set with too much detail may detract from the main action on the characters.  Colours need to be carefully considered so that they work alongside the colour of the characters and the lighting.  We are using a lot of fairly saturated colour lighting and this can alter the perceived colour of the set.
 

'So I killed a bit of time there to give them time to show up.  Still not here?  Oh my, maybe tomorrow then.'