Make Your Own Exploding Business Card

A great way to add more images/details into your business card.  Trevor takes you through how to create your own 'exploding' business card.  Whether you hand it out to a select few clients or just use it as a compact portfolio is up to you!

A great way to fit more images or information into your business cards. Obviously, you would only hand out to a select few, as they take a little time to make but they create a bigger impact.

Children's Festivals Survival Guide Part 2: Performance

If you have written a children's book or are thinking of writing one, you will need to consider how you represent yourself and your book at children's book festivals.  Here we give some tips on how to get the best out your reading performance; from audience interaction to ideas in addition to the reading itself...

10 key tips to help you when presenting your book at children's festivals. This part deals with the performance day itself! Link to activity sheet handout: https://goo.gl/NB6wak

Children's Festivals Survival Guide Part 1: Preparation

It's not enough to write a children's book, you need to get out there and let everybody know about it!  But what are some of the things you need to consider when preparing for your event?

The next episode in our brand new Pixels and Paper episode is all about how to survive presenting a children's book at festivals.

Let us guide you through our top ten tips for preparation...

How to prepare for reading or performing your book at a children's festivals. We take you through our 10 key points when getting ready for the big day.

Storyboard to Screen: The Pitfalls

So, our first of regular weekly "Paper & Pixels" videos taking you through all aspects of animation and animated story production.

They will become more polished as we progress, so please except this is a little rough and ready to start!

Storyboard template: https://tinyurl.com/ybcsbaay We take you through some of the issues to look out for when creating your own storyboard and some of the steps we take to the final animated scene. We create animated ebooks but we hope that some of the tips detailed here will apply to many other types of animation.

The Art of the Landing Page - Welcome to Tallowmere

Tapocketa Studio is a new indie UK animation studio who were recently commissioned by Faber Music to work with them and Keaton Henson, a musician, visual artist and poet.  The brief was to create a single webpage animating Keaton’s artwork in the lead up to the release of 'The Tallowmere Annual', a collection of his works.  Here, Trevor Young, co-founder and animator at Tapocketa Studio details the process and reflects on how Welcome to Tallowmere shows how not all landing pages are, or should be, created equal.

A still from Welcome to Tallowmere

courtesy of Faber Music Ltd © Keaton Henson

The Tallowmere Album

A Long Way From Galdovia

Starting work on 'Welcome to Tallowmere' took quite a mental leap from our previous project, a children’s interactive book.  In a brief period of time we’d gone from the colour and pomp of the land of Galdovia in Galdo’s Gift to the dark and haunting town of Tallowmere.  The two places linked only by a tree swaying in the wind that caught the interpretative eye of Jack Halsey at Faber Music.  He saw it as something that would work, albeit with very different styling, for the motion they wanted to bring to the artwork of Keaton Henson, a musician and talented artist whose ink wash images echo the dark melancholy of his music.  One of these paintings would be animated to create an online page that would build curiosity for the release of a book of Keaton’s artworks, writings and music (the reader can plug their headphones into the book to hear a specially composed track that accompanies the words and imagery).

Where to begin

The tree animation was the starting point.  As time went on, we added animation to various other elements.  Heavy clouds began to roll across the sky, telegraph cables swayed in the wind, birds darted across distant skies.  Elements of the painting could be orchestrated into action at various intervals in the lead up to the book’s release.  The image could evolve and that was an exciting prospect.

A single cryptic social post from Keaton opened the doors to his many fans who curiously mulled over what they found, exchanging excited queries over what it all meant and puzzling over what was about to arrive.

 

Revisiting Tallowmere

Another post from Keaton and his followers would find something strange had happened to the windows in the image.  Intermittently a window would light up and become a bright cutout (alluding to images in the book that also contain objects in the image that have been ‘cut out’ to leave blank shapes).  Then after a short time the window would return to it’s original state.  Something had changed.  Clicking on one of these windows slowly reveals a panel with an image of a long abandoned object; a hint to a story yet to be told.

All this set against the eerie soundscape of Tallowmere; distant howling, the bleak wind through the abandoned streets.  Stay a while and you’ll hear Keaton’s soulful piano music begin to play, a dark serenade to accompany your visit to Tallowmere.

 A short section of animation from Tallowmere

A short section of animation from Tallowmere

Here, a single online page could evolve and adapt over time to build a pathway to the final reveal of the book.  A page that showed itself to be organic; changing and growing, hinting and enticing, adaptive and responsive.

Although an unfolding precursor to the main event, it showed that something that was in essence a landing page could become something of an artwork in it’s own right…

welcome to tallowmere

 

Extra info: Early stages of 'Welcome to Tallowmere' allowed visitors to register to receive notification of the final reveal.  When revealed to be a book, visitors could click through to be taken to a pre-order page or, as it is now, purchase The Tallowmere annual.

How to make a Boovie: part 1 overview

Ok, first things first, what's a Boovie?

It's our word for something that's not a book and is not a movie, it's a hybrid of both.  Every page has an animated illustration, a short looping movie that brings rich and colourful images to life (basically a very enhanced ebook -but we are not keen on the word 'ebook').

One of the double page spreads from Galdo's Gift -The Boovie

We've developed various inventive techniques for creating an animating these illustrations and were asked recently about the process and how it could help children learn when producing our first Boovie, Galdo's Gift.

So we decided to make a short video to explain ourselves.  It's one of our first, so please be kind.

Book Festival Fun: or 5 ways to cope with the crowd -2/5

2/5

Gusto

Wow, Gusto is a great guy. What do you mean you've never met him? Oh man, he's the best; gregarious, confident, nothing phases Gusto.

Gusto always looks at the upside of any predicament, never wavering in his focus to brighten up any situation. He's the master of his own destiny, king of confidence, duke of daring deeds, chancellor of cheer....you know what I mean, you get the idea.

Faced with a crowd of people, all staring at him, waiting anxiously for him to begin, he strides out before them like a demi-god, an unswervingly confident, lucky sod.

No hat too silly, no shirt too garish, always smiling, always swish. He dons his curly wigs with flair, he doesn't care about his hair.

You may know Gusto has a twin, though no one likes to mention him.

Oh dear, here comes Meeker now, come on Meeker take a bow.

He shuffles up to the plate, makes excuses why he's late.

Mumbles his lines, drops his script, over his laces he has tripped.

Getting up, he bangs his head, apologises, face turns red.

Stumbling back onto the stage, “what's my line?”, “where's my page?”

He clears his throat, he sounds quite hoarse, he's lost his audience now, of course.

Oh dear, why? Where did they go?

They've wandered off to see Gusto.

 

-Trevor Young, Tapocketa

 

We realised we needed Gusto for all our public appearance, and did our best to lose Meeker along the way. Worrying about making mistakes, we found, is more disabling than the mistakes themselves. Throwing yourself into your performance with gusto takes people along with you.

 

The odd mistake is all part of the show when done with flair of the Great Gusto.

Book Festival Fun : or 5 ways to avoid public humiliation -1/5

 'I'm ready for my close up' - Eleanor helps frame this little character

'I'm ready for my close up' - Eleanor helps frame this little character

1/5

Prep

When it comes to preparation for a book festival reading, there are probably people who are a lot more self-confident than we are who would just turn up and see what happens. If you do this, take a well deserved bow; probably to the three people that turned up and slow clapped you as you left after your half-baked performance, away with you!

Ok, some may smugly recount the the time they “didn't prepare at all and it went fantastico”; well I'm not listening -la, la, la, la. You played with the proverbial children's festival bumper box of matches one time and didn't get burnt, lucky you, smarty pants! What? You've been doing it for years? Oh right, yeah, that's the exception, I'm just talking about those who are new to this, on your way please.

So, our prep regime was tough; up at dawn for vocal exercises and smile practice, rigorous silly gesturing rehearsal and, being true method actors becoming absorbed by our characters King Galdo and Brendara and the rest, months in advance of the big day...

...or alternatively, we may have just had a quick run through the day before. Yes, I think it was that last one.

Eleanor and myself holding on to our last shreds of dignity

"Why is everyone avoiding us?"

To be fair we had already performed a number of times at a local school, so we had an idea of what we were going to do. We knew we were going to use cardboard masks of our characters (actually, I managed to persuade Eleanor to do all the mask wearing, me wearing them would have creeped the children out). We knew we were going to get the audience to join in by helping us with the sound effects. We also knew that we needed to prepare our performance based on what we had learnt from that school booking.

Oh yeah, I almost forgot, other prep stuff: we had posters made up (beautifully designed by a talented designer called Eleanor) which went up in the local bookshop a week before the event.

poster design by Eleanor

Our friend and all round pr guru, Emma, rallied round beforehand getting us a mention on local mummy blogs and an hour or so before the performance we walked around in silly hats handing out flyers and stickers and pleaded with anyone who would listen to come and see the show or risk seeing me, a grown man, break down to a shell of my former self before their eyes. At which point many people told me that would not be necessary as they were already coming anyway as they already knew about it -the power of prep.

Little Critics: Kid's early reviews on our book

Kids feedback for the book

So the results are in...

The little critics have spoken.  We have always been told to prepare ourselves, kid's don't tread lightly on your emotional sensitivities when it comes to their cold honest opinion.  Well, I'm not sure that's totally true, some do but those aren't the opinions that get your attention.

We take your comments seriously.

We had managed to get back a large portion of the forms (see previous blog post) we handed out and it was time to sift through the results.  This, together with some of the questions that children had asked on our school visit, gave us a much better overview of what appealed and what didn't when it came to our book.

Some of the comments were more about our performance than the book itself (one boy remarked on the 'fat old frog king', it took a moment to realise he was talking about my character performance i.e. about me, cue slightly over-long laughing fit from Eleanor); although we were more interested in getting feedback for the book rather than our acting skills or physical attributes at this point in time.

The overwhelming feedback was hugely positive (even now I can tell you are waiting for the few that weren't, you are aren't you?  I can tell.  Shame on you!).  

Nothing was quite as we expected

 Dandy Doogood, no less.

Dandy Doogood, no less.

The favourite character from the story was Dandy Doogood.  Lots of children liked him because of his fabulous hair, so there you go.  We wondered if this wasn't also because he was the youngest character but that wasn't mentioned.  We thought perhaps a character closer to their age wins their favour more than the older characters (particularly that 'fat old frog king -just drop it, Trevor).  Doogood happened to be a character we weren't sure about previously, but he has now won our confidence.

 

 

Here are a few of the comments we got back:

What did you like about the story of Galdo's Gift?...

'I liked how it was animated and how you made the characters move.  I also like how the characters were made to look weird and funny.'  -Ben, aged 9

'I liked the names.' -Bethany, aged 10

childrens book review 01

'I like how it had a lot of humour in it.' -Jasmine, aged 10

'It's very adventurous and exciting' -Tameem, aged 10

'I was very excited about all of the weird characters' -Ana, aged 9

'it was hilaryus' (sic) -Abigail, aged 9/10 -(!?)

 

 
snail with slime
childrens book review 03

Anything you didn't like?...

'Mustafo because of the bird on his head' -Maia, aged 9  (it is not going to be a bird anymore)

red character portrait Mustafo
 

'No!', 'Nope', "no!!!!", 'nothing' -the large majority -thank you!

'I liked it all so 5 stars for you' -James, aged 10  (honoured, thanks, James)

'I didn't like anything.  I loved everything' Lily, aged 9 (-phew!)

'It was hard to keep up with the story' -Leon, aged 8 (we think this might have been partly our performance of the story but nevertheless we have since revisited large sections of the poem to better pace out the story and it's clarity and the poem is all the better for it).

'the dragon poo' -James, aged 9 (I take your point, James, but your are seriously outnumbered on this one; what can I say, I had my reservations but the crowd wins I'm afraid)

slimey snail
 

'When Strompoff brought back snails' (he doesn't bring back snails anymore but it wasn't this comment that made us change it, honest)

'It was all perfect' -Sam, aged 10 (this can't be true, but thank you, Sam)

childrens book review 02

'The colour sceams (sic)' Daniel, aged 9 (a fair comment from our art critic here, although we did get a lot of kids saying they liked the colours)

 

Learning at school

So just a selection there.  We were happy that the overwhelming comments were great but we have not shied away from tackling the criticisms as well.  There has been a lot of rewrites since our school visit based on the feedback we got from the forms and the questions.

One little boy asked about why the heroes brought back what they did.  That was a fair point; it is not enough just to put something into a story because you think it is funny or gross.  A lot of children needed a good reason behind it as well, the detail was important.  We realised that there were gaps in the story that we hadn't realised were there because we had behind-the-scenes knowledge that filled those gaps for us; we needed to pass that on.  Rewrites involved adding excuses/reasoning from the heroes as to why they brought back what they did and it has added validity to the story.

Galdovia fantasy land

We have also taken onboard comments from friends who have read the story to their children.  This can very much be a process of reading between the lines as naturally friends don't want to hurt your feelings.

In the end you can't be upset if the response is not what you hoped on release of the book if you haven't responded to criticism on the way.  It can also give you an extra boost to the creative process to hear lots of great stuff about our work too!

 

Formed Opinions: The Fine Art of Kid's Feedback Forms

Bob the Burger - Austin aged 10.  Has a sidekick called Nigel the Nugget, apparently.

Our main purpose of presenting our book to children is to get their opinions.  That might sound pretty obvious but in the heat of preparations for our school presentation it was easily something that could become an afterthought.

A selection of masks and props for our school performance

As always, we'd given ourselves an enormous amount of work to do, printing, cutting and sticking bits together to make our presentation more visually exciting than just looking at Eleanor and myself.  Now you might say, if you read your book in a certain way you will bring it alive, capture the children's imagination and you won't need all those props; we needed the props.

Consequently, we didn't have a huge amount of time to think about how we were going to get honest feedback from the children.  We did have a question and answer session on the day, but you always feel you are missing the views from the less gregarious children and we wanted views from across the spectrum of personalities.

Unformulaic

So we decided on creating a feedback form that we could handout.  Yeah boring, right?  Well no!  That's where you're wrong (if you thought that, I mean; if you didn't then I apologise, that was a rash and presumptive of me) we were going to make sure it was anything but boring.  It would have lots of colour and things to do as well as collecting their views along the way.

So one side asked a few simple straightforward questions about the book and the other side had something fun to do: Create Your Own Hero!  Woo Hoo!

Actually that 'Create Your Own Hero' side proved to be a very good call, but before I explain why, here are the two sides of that single page form...

kid's feedback form FRONT

Kid's feedback form BACK

Forming a Relationship

Feedback fun

When we got a batch of the forms back later that week, we started to realise that, far from just being a fun activity, the 'Create a Hero' side of the form actually told us something about the child who had made the comments on feedback side of the form.  It was a way of getting a clearer picture about the sort of child that had decided to comment on one aspect or another.  Something we will definitely consider when gleaning future feedback -find out a little bit about the person making the comment if you can!

Mr Toast 

Making adjustments based on feedback can be difficult if you don't understand more about the person that gave that feedback.  It could mean that you could be in danger of making a sweeping change to your story where a nuanced alteration would have been the solution.

Oh yeah, plus we got to see lots of funny hero creations, plus we now have lots of funny hero pictures to post on our site (which we will do and let you know, of course).

And we will discuss the feedback in future posts.

 

 

Character-Forming

Mrs Toast, of course

The teachers were also happy with the story creation aspect of 'Create You Own Hero' (it was part of their school book week).  We had given the children a chance to give their hero a score rating for strength, courage and wisdom.  This 'Top Trumps' style scoring gimmick actually made the children think a little more about the attributes of their protagonist before they started their story.  Yes, they could score their hero a ten out of ten for everything but does that make for a very interesting character?  Isn't what makes a character interesting their weaknesses too?  Even if they are a hero.

One other interesting point to note that surprised me: I'm glad we handed the forms out at the end.  Once those forms were in front of the children, that was it.  Heads down, filling them out, all attention to us was lost.  Not a bad way to finish though, we just need to make sure we never hand them out at the beginning!

School Results

Eleanor and Trevor losing whatever remaining dignity they ever had

There is no hiding anymore, time to step into the spotlight and sink or swim.

A collection of harsh little critics file into the school hall and sit down and deliver their finest harsh critic gazes towards us. This is just the first of seven sessions presenting our book to the children of Commonswood Primary School.

Snail sketch

Now, something we had created from scratch, will be laid out for children to see, and critique.  We came armed with big colourful images and big colourful masks. I would narrate and Eleanor was to act out all the characters.

Eleanor slapped a cardboard crown on the front of my Velcro'd head and we were away.  There followed a slightly awkward, ad-hoc rendition of the book., with the children helping us by providing the sound effects such as fanfares, sword-swishing and booing (now, hold on there -we had asked them to boo, it was part of the story, honest!).  We'd given ourselves a lot of mask-swapping and prop manipulation and it was quite a challenge.

 Making it in the world of kid's lit takes nerves of steel

Making it in the world of kid's lit takes nerves of steel

I can't claim that our first performance was a finely polished masterpiece, but we had given it our best shot.  This was our first time after all.  I was happy we had made it through.

snail small

Then we showed them the trailer and explained how we created some of the characters from bits of card and showed them some of our models.  Then we answered some of their questions (thankfully no 'why are you here?'), handed out activity sheets/feedback sheets (more about those in future blogs) and they filed out to make way for the next class.  This was exhausting and we had only done one.  Six more to go.

However, as we went from performance to performance throughout the day, we got better and started to realise where to put our focus, involving the children more and spending more time showing them the models and the process.

A few of the children had their photo taken wearing the masks and holding the props and they loved it.

 A couple of masked heroes

A couple of masked heroes

In a future blog I will detail more of what we learnt and the feedback we got.  Safe to say it was a very valuable experience and I'm glad we stepped out of our comfort zone to do it.

 

Blast Off

Evil Eleanor as Brendara, ready to blast some blood-sucking bats to bits

Great we've managed to book up a number of public presentations of Galdo's Gift.  That's fantastic!  Woo hoo!  Go Tapocketa, yeah!

---pause---

'Yay.  Good.''

---pause---

'Yeah, it's going to be good.'

....

'Er, have you had any thoughts as to what we might do?'

'I dunno, you?'

Well, thankfully, ideas and elaboration are our strong point; our problem is time.  We need to find some way of presenting our book to a whole bunch of heckling children that is fun colourful and inventive and relatively quick.  We decided the best idea was to blow everything up.

That is to say, we would take the illustrations directly from the book and blow them up to human size so we could perform the story at full scale.  We would just need to work out how we could attach the character heads to ourselves and be able to switch them quickly.

 

Ingredients:

A whole bunch of illustrations

A bemused local printing shop

A lot of thick card

Tonnes of Velcro

A huge loss of dignity

 

With a skull cap made from Velcro (which looked fine on Eleanor but for some reason on me gave the air of someone all prepped up for the electric chair, 'sorry, kids') and its Velcro counterpart attached to the back of each character mask; we had our quick-change system ready.

some of the card masks and props ready for the school presentation

Child's Play

Our first 'gig' would be Commonswood Primary School in Welwyn Garden City.  We had initially asked if we could 'perhaps, kindly have a quick session talking to a few children about the book, if that would be to much of a problem, thank you'. 

Cut to: booked for seven half hour sessions each with thirty children (the last session would actually be sixty children) aged from seven to eleven, all on the same day.  -'Oh, *gulp*, thank you, that sounds great'.  Oh God.

Ok, so no hiding, time to step up...

5... 4... 3... 2... 1...

(to be continued...)

 

 
 Ready for battle

Ready for battle

 

World Book Day: Dr. Seuss

Dr. Seuss (real name Theodor Seuss Geisel)        [image:Library of Congress]

So today is world book day and also the birthday of the late, great Dr. Seuss.  In the image above he is sketching Grinch for the 'How the Grinch Stole Christmas' but his most famous book, of course, was 'The Cat in the Hat'.

Cat In The Hat

In 1950s USA, books that were intended to further children's literacy were mighty boring and it was felt that children's reading was suffering as a result.  A challenge was put to Seuss to come up with a story that used a pool of 250 words that were thought to be vital for first grader's literacy levels. He was also to make it actually fun to read.  He penned The Cat in the Hat and it was an instant success.

Ted Geisel

Dr. Seuss was his pen name (he left Oxford without a degree), he started using the name because he was caught drinking gin at college during the prohibition era and, although he was then banned from contributing illustrations to the college publication, continued under this thinly-veiled pseudonym.  His real name was Theodor Geisel.

Propaganda

Seuss' life was not without controversy, he was recruited as a propagandist during America's war with Japan and the racist tone of the illustrations from this time and early in his career were a source of great regret later in his life.

Helen

Seuss' wife, Helen Palmer, was devoted to him and it was this devotion that led to her to take her own life in despair when, after many illnesses and knowing she was losing Seuss to another woman, Audrey Dimond, she took an overdose of barbiturates.

She left a tender note...

"I am too old and enmeshed in everything you do and are, that I cannot conceive of life without you ... My going will leave quite a rumor but you can say I was overworked and overwrought. Your reputation with your friends and fans will not be harmed ... Sometimes think of the fun we had all thru the years ..."

Seuss was distraught.  Seuss' niece, Peggy, later said "Whatever Helen did, she did it out of absolute love for Ted." Peggy called Helen's death "her last and greatest gift to him.".

Seuss married Audrey eight months later.

His Legacy

Dr. Seuss left an indelible mark on the world of children's books.  I love the way he plays with verse and subverts the normal construct in the service of fun, both in the text and the imagery.  He made sure never to use a moral as the basis for a story (he once stated "children can see a moral coming a mile off") and he has shown many children how joyful and playful words can be.

There is no doubting that there are demons to wrestle if you are going to give your carte blanche adoration to Dr Seuss, but perhaps on World Book Day we can look to the work and give credit to the positive influence it has had on the lives of many children across the globe for so many years.

 

Character Building

paper character

Here you can see the various elements that go towards making up a complete character for Galdo's Gift.

character building 01

Below is a snapshot image of all the body parts we have created to allow us a huge array of options when creating a character.  In fact, these body parts are just for the King's many subjects within the book.  We have more parts for the heroes, Galdo himself and others.

t gives us a huge amount of flexibility when creating the characters and, because they are made up of different parts, we can animate them as well.

Pick your nose, ...or mouth

Inspirations

The more senior among us will remember Ivor the Engine and Captain Pugwash, UK children's TV programmes broadcast in the 70s which used a similar technique albeit never digitised.  More recently South Park use paper cutouts and stop motion to create it's manic characters.  Our methods are very similar, although we scan all our drawings into the computer and colour, light and animate them digitally.

An example of Victorian paper theatre image courtesy of ©Kotomi on Flickr


Our original inspiration were things such as the miniature paper theatres of the Victorian era which recreated scenes from the stage.  We had moved on from this influence but with recent developments in Galdo's Gift, it's working it's way back into the story again.

How to get a head of the crowd

If you print this, you will have headed paper -(sorry)

So the heroes of our story need a host of adoring fans and, despite what they say, three is not nearly enough for a crowd.

No, it's going to take more than that; a hero is just not a hero if there are just three lowly admirers raising a barely audible cheer on our protagonist's triumphant return.  Perhaps we could make one admirer and copy and paste times twenty, would that do?  No?  Ah, ok.

Colourful Characters

one of our King's subjects, ready for colour

We've made up a collection of characters to inhabit Galdo's kingdom from the numerous body parts we have created.  Once we have decided on a few of our favourites, the process begins of colouring the various body parts based on our selected palette.

The multi-coloured heads you see in the image above is the first stage of this colouring process.  The colours you see here are far from the final colours (we will adjust those later).  For now, we are just colouring in.

In the next post (on Friday) I will show the process of picking the body parts (all sounds a bit Frankenstein, I know) and how we turn them into fully fledged characters.

hand picked: a selection of some of the hands we have at our disposal

Gilty Pleasures

 pure gold... work in progress lettering for Galdo's Gift inside cover

pure gold... work in progress lettering for Galdo's Gift inside cover

One of the books we are using as reference: Nature Walks and Talks, available at all secret old bookshops.

When working on the inside cover of Galdo's Gift we are taking inspiration from a number of very old books we have gathering dust on our shelves (ok, we don't dust our books).

One technique that was used on many old books and that fits very well with our story is gilding (applying layers of gold leaf), in this case gold lettering, motifs and decoration.  The more modern method (used on the books we have access to) is hot foil stamping (pressing a gold leaf substitute onto the surface with metal type).  This has it's own unique charm, especially when printed onto a textural material and given the passage of time.

Even though our book is in digital land, we want to harness some of the charm and character of old books; including the knocks and scrapes they have gathered as they are passed on from one semi-careful owner to the next.

 acorn motif in Galdo's Gift

acorn motif in Galdo's Gift

We want our book to feel like it has been passed on down the generations and ended up in your hands.

 lettering on our flyers

lettering on our flyers

Monster Mash Ups

creature chaos: some of the many drawings that have been created for Galdo's Gift

The stuff of our nightmares are rarely under the bed or in the wardrobe (unless you are a fashion stylist perusing inside my wardrobe), they are out there in our everyday world.  As a child these demons surfaced in the form of the school bully, a vindictive teacher or the embodiment of all evil, Brussels sprouts.  Sorry Brussels sprout lovers.

It's something to bear in mind when breathing life into monsters for children's books.  Do you want them to represent these fears?  Oftentimes humans can quite happily fulfill this role anyway.  Additionally, fear of creatures other than ourselves isn't really the noblest of objectives when comes to wonderful world of children's literature.

We also need to avoid creating actual nightmares for our more sensitive readership.  A bad actor in an laughably unconvincing rubber creature costume on Doctor Who could scare the proverbials out of me when I was five years old.  We certainly don't want to cause sleepless nights.

Thankfully, our technique of constructing our creatures out of constituent parts has allowed us to mix and match to find the perfect look for everything from enormous rabid blood-sucking bats to giant screaming snakes. 

Sweet dreams, everyone.

 

 

Defining Moment

 So, how to make reading and understanding fun for children...

So, how to make reading and understanding fun for children...

Everybody likes print books.  If you don't, I don't want to be your friend; there I said it.

So we are creating a digital book.

'Whaaa?  I thought you just said...', yes I know, it seems a little back-to-front and we will bring out a print book version in good time, but hear me out.  There is a reason why digital books should have their place among the stories that children enjoy. 

We know what digital books don't offer; their tactile nature, the intimacy of the page to reader experience, the ability to have varying formats; big, small, pop up, cutouts etc.  But they do have the ability to enhance the reading experience in their own way.  We've been speaking to parents and teachers about our ideas for Galdo's Gift and they are very excited by the possibilities it presents.

One of those is the ability to click on any word and find out what it means.  This, to us, seemed like a small thing to begin with.  Hardly setting the world alight, right?  Well, to a child that is reluctant to read because a book has many words that they simply don't understand, it's a game changer.

And the advantages don't stop there, but that's for another day.

The Changing Landscape

a newhorizon... Eleanor's latest paper model of Galdovia

Galdovia is always somewhere we wanted to revisit and truly explore what it has to offer.

Previous visits had always been fleeting.  There was never time to take in it's full potential, we had to push on, quicken the pace, 'no time to linger' barked the uncompromising, yet dashing, Trevor.

Well sometimes it's good to pause, contemplate and revisit; you begin to see what you truly missed the first time around.

Eleanor revisited Galdovia; sighed it's cool fresh air, strolled its winding hill paths and misty valleys and brought the landscape into crystal sharp focus before our eyes...

...and next time, we go together.

The Book Look

 A section from our latest Galdo's Gift page backdrop

A section from our latest Galdo's Gift page backdrop

Looking worse for wear...much like the martyrs in the book

One thing that is important to Eleanor and I when making Galdo's Gift is to stay true to, and celebrate, the beauty of books.  This may sound contradictory when you learn that Galdo's Gift will firstly be a digital book;  we don't see it that way.  We want to encapsulate all that we love about print books alongside what a digital book can offer.

The image here is the front cover from a very old book I have inherited from my parents, The Foxes Book of Martyrs (a church copy, listing the stories of many Christian martyrs through history).  It has many of the qualities that have consciously fed into the design of our book.

Obviously a digital book can't be as wonderfully tactile as a print book, but we can draw a lot from it's visual texture, patterns and surface qualities and add all that is good about digital books; animation, sound, informative visual overlays, increased engagement of reluctant readers; the list goes on.

We look forward to sharing that experience with all of you.